Skip to main content

Raymii.org Logo (IEC resistor symbol)logo

Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
Home | About | All pages | RSS Feed | Gopher

Hi there!

I'm Remy, a developer with a focus on C, C++, linux and embedded systems.

I currently work for De Jong DUKE were I develop software for an embedded platform that powers coffee machines. This is a C++, C and Qt stack running on Yocto linux and Nucleus RTOS. It controls hardware, runs the UI and has a few utilities for IoT connectivity and configuration. Technology is mostly C++ but includes Microsoft Visual C++, Flash, Qt and ARM kernel drivers.

I've been a Linux and UNIX sysadmin for over 10 years.

To read more or get in touch, click here.

This is my personal website, these articles do not reflect or are based on work, opinions or policies of any of my (previous) employers. Any resemblance to reality is pure coincidence.

Latest Items

Site updates, new layout

08-05-2019 | Remy van Elst

This site is generated with my self-written open source static site generator named ingsoc (named after 1984). I've updated the layout of the website to be less cluttered, allowing you to get to the content much faster. Inspired by my recent gopher adventures I decided to do away with the 2 column layout (drop the sidebar with menu) and have a smaller header with essential links. On mobile this makes a huge difference in scrolling, on the desktop it looks less cluttered. This article details all the changes with side by side images showing differences.

Read more...

Bash Bits: Find all files containing specific text (and remove them)

07-05-2019 | Remy van Elst

Bash Bits are small examples, tips and tutorials for Bash (Scripts). This bash bit shows you how to find all files containing specific text, and how to remove them.

Read more...

Create a PDP-8 OS8 RK05 system disk from RX01 floppies with SIMH (and get text files in and out of the PDP-8)

Published: 07-12-2016 | Last update: 07-05-2019 | Author: Remy van Elst

This guide shows you how to build an RK05 bootable system disk with OS/8 on it for the PDP-8, in the SIMH emulator. We will use two RX01 floppies as the build source, copy over all the files and set up the LPT printer and the PTR/PIP paper tape punch/readers. As an added bonus the article also shows you how to get text files in and out of the PDP-8 sytem using the printer and papertape reader / puncher.

Read more...

Bash Bits: Randomize a cronjob to run between 00:00 and 06:00 hours

06-05-2019 | Remy van Elst

Bash Bits are small examples, tips and tutorials for Bash (Scripts). This bash bit shows you how to randomize the time a cronjob runs in /etc/cron.d/

Read more...

Bash Bits: Check if a program is installed

05-05-2019 | Remy van Elst

Bash Bits are small examples, tips and tutorials for Bash (Scripts). This bash bit shows you how to check if a piece of software is installed on a machine. It's a function you can use in your shell scripts.

Read more...

OpenSSL test TLSv1.3 connection and ciphersuites with s_client

28-04-2019 | Remy van Elst

This guide shows you how to test a server's TLSv1.3 connection and use specific ciphersuites with the command line s_client client from the OpenSSL project. With OpenSSL 1.1.1 you can use TLSv1.3. This guide covers the installation of OpenSSL 1.1.1 on Ubuntu, testing the connection to a server and specific ciphersuites. It also covers the big differences between TLSv1.3 and lower.

Read more...

Strong SSL Security on nginx

Published: 14-06-2015 | Last update: 27-04-2019 | Author: Remy van Elst

This tutorial shows you how to set up strong SSL security on the nginx webserver. We do this by updating OpenSSL to the latest version to mitigate attacks like Heartbleed, disabling SSL Compression and EXPORT ciphers to mitigate attacks like FREAK, CRIME and LogJAM, disabling SSLv3 and below because of vulnerabilities in the protocol and we will set up a strong ciphersuite that enables Forward Secrecy when possible. We also enable HSTS and HPKP. This way we have a strong and future proof ssl configuration and we get an A+ on the Qually Labs SSL Test.

Read more...

Strong SSL Security on Apache2

Published: 14-06-2015 | Last update: 27-04-2019 | Author: Remy van Elst

This tutorial shows you how to set up strong SSL security on the Apache2 webserver. We do this by updating OpenSSL to the latest version to mitigate attacks like Heartbleed, disabling SSL Compression and EXPORT ciphers to mitigate attacks like FREAK, CRIME and LogJAM, disabling SSLv3 and below because of vulnerabilities in the protocol and we will set up a strong ciphersuite that enables Forward Secrecy when possible. We also enable HSTS and HPKP. This way we have a strong and future proof ssl configuration and we get an A+ on the Qually Labs SSL Test.

Read more...

Strong SSL Security on lighttpd

Published: 14-06-2015 | Last update: 27-04-2019 | Author: Remy van Elst

This tutorial shows you how to set up strong SSL security on the lighttpd webserver. We do this by updating OpenSSL to the latest version to mitigate attacks like Heartbleed, disabling SSL Compression and EXPORT ciphers to mitigate attacks like FREAK, CRIME and LogJAM, disabling SSLv3 and below because of vulnerabilities in the protocol and we will set up a strong ciphersuite that enables Forward Secrecy when possible. We also enable HSTS and HPKP. This way we have a strong and future proof ssl configuration and we get an A+ on the Qually Labs SSL Test.

Read more...

totext.py - Convert URL or RSS feed to text with readability

18-04-2019 | Remy van Elst

Love plaintext? This script downloads an URL, parses it with readability and returns the plaintext (as markdown). It supports RSS feeds (will convert every article in the feed) and saves every article. My usecase is twofold. One is to convert RSS feeds to a gopher site, the second is to get full text in my RSS reader. The script contains a few workarounds for so-called cookiewalls. It also pauses between RSS feed articles to not do excessive requests. The readability part is handled by Python, no external services are used.

Read more...

Convert markdown inline links to reference style links with Pandoc

10-04-2019 | Remy van Elst

Markdown has two options to create a link. A link is the piece of text you click to go to another webpage. Actually, three ways, since you can just embed HTML code in Markdown. I write all the content for this site in Markdown files, which are then converted by my static site generator to HTML, text and a gopher version. I'm used to using the inline link style, which is where you paste the link right in the text. Since I've enabled the Gopher version of raymii.org, I noticed that there was no line wrapping. The HTML website all arranges that via CSS, but the text-only Gopher does not. Sometimes Gopher clients wrap text, but most don't. I'm re-wrapping all articles to make them fit, but the wrapping is way off with inline style markdown links. By converting them to reference style markdown links, the wrapping looks way better, and as an added bonus, reference style links give a better overview. There are a few scripts floating around to convert these links, but either Ruby or NodeJS. It turns out after a bit of research that Pandoc, the anything-to-anything text conversion tool, has an option to use reference style links. With this option, I converted all the articles here (almost 400) to the reference style Markdown links.

Read more...

View all Items